MIET Africa will have a new CEO from 1 January 2018

We are pleased to announce the appointment of Beverley Dyason to the position of CEO, with effect from 1 January 2018.

With over 20 years’ experience in education, Beverley is a passionate champion of the rights of children and youth to quality education.  She is also no stranger to MIET Africa and has a deep understanding of the organization and its operating environment. She started working with MIET Africa in 2000 as a consultant and joined the organisation full time in 2010. Her natural leadership skills soon became evident, and in 2013 she was appointed as one of the organization’s five directors. Through her work in materials development and programme implementation, she has acquired expertise across a wide range of areas including but not limited to, inclusive education, child rights, life skills, health promotion, career development, employability, sustainable livelihoods, entrepreneurship and curriculum development.

Beverley is committed to MIET Africa’s vision of quality education for all and believes strongly in partnering for maximum impact.

What about the vulnerable boy child?

What about the vulnerable boy child?

Download: What about the vulnerable boy child?

As SADC’s implementing partner for CSTL, MIET Africa is increasingly aware of the paucity of support for boys and young men as compared for that of vulnerable girls and young women.

The paper highlights the vulnerability of boys and young men, and argues that engaging them in a more holistic approach to gender equality, and addressing their own specific vulnerabilities, has the potential to benefit both boys and girls. It concludes with recommendations for strengthening support for boys and young men within the CSTL framework.

World Youth Skills Day: 15 July

World Youth Skills Day: 15 July

Young people should be at the forefront of global change and innovation. Empowered, they can be key agents for development and peace. If, however, they are left on society’s margins, all of us will be impoverished. KOFI ANNAN

World Youth Skills Day comes almost exactly a month after South Africa’s Youth Day, which commemorates the sacrifices made by the students of 1976 in standing up against the Apartheid regime. Designated by the UN General Assembly in 2014, World Youth Skills Day serves to highlight the importance of youth skills development, surely one of the most pressing of the challenges of the twenty-first century.

As the UN notes (see www.un.org/en/events/youthskillsday/), “Young people are almost three times more likely to be unemployed than adults and [are] continuously exposed to lower quality of jobs, greater labor market inequalities, and longer and more insecure school-to-work transitions.” These challenges are compounded for young women,

Addressing Barriers to Learning through Innovative Learning Environments

Addressing Barriers to Learning through Innovative Learning Environments

Download: Innovative Learning Environments

MIET Africa’s Innovative Learning Environments project, implemented in three schools in KZN, South Africa, devised and trialled a range of innovative strategies to improve learning outcomes of seriously underachieving learners. The use of electronic devices proved to be a particularly powerful strategy for learning mathematics, especially when their use was paired with tuition and support by mentor learners.

Honouring the youth of 1976; advancing youth empowerment in 2017

Honouring the youth of 1976; advancing youth empowerment in 2017

June 16 is the centrepiece of Youth Month in South Africa. On this day, we commemorate the sacrifices made by youth defiantly standing up to the Apartheid regime in the 1976 Soweto Uprising.  Hundreds of young people were killed when they protested against the attempt to impose Afrikaans as a medium of instruction in secondary schools—a measure both exclusionary and a violation of their fundamental right to quality education in a language accessible to them.

Today’s youth enjoy the fruits of the hard-fought freedom that those courageous students in 1976 fought for. But nowadays many of youth in our country face other challenges, including, but not in any way limited to, unemployment and exclusion from the mainstream economy. Ironically, part of the reason is the less than optimal education system itself, which, despite gains made since 1994, has inadequately prepared youth for the realities of the 21st century economy.

Maximizing opportunities in data management

Maximizing opportunities in data management

Download: KGS_Data management

Large development programmes that are heavily data-dependent pose considerable challenges, both logistical and analytical. This paper seeks to highlight the challenges associated with traditional systems (i.e. paper-based) of data collection and analysis, and demonstrates how the utilization of digitized technologies (as demonstrated in the Young Women and Girls Programme [see Keeping Girls in School]) can enhance efficiencies in logistics, analysis and overall project management.

 

Thursday, 1 June: Global Day of Parents

Thursday, 1 June: Global Day of Parents

In 2012, the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed 1 June as Global Day of Parents to honour parents across the world “for their selfless commitment to children and their lifelong sacrifice towards nurturing this relationship.”

Parents are the anchors of the family and the foundation of our communities and societies, educating and socializing children and youth, and caring for young and old.

We salute parents and caregivers—mothers, fathers, grandparents, aunts, uncles, siblings – and the role that they play in raising children: loving them, teaching them, providing for them, supporting them, nurturing them, protecting them and guiding them on their path to a happy, fulfilled and productive life as adults.

 

CSTL Malawi visit

CSTL Malawi visit

On 9 May, the Malawian Ministry of Education, Science and Technology hosted a visit by SDC and MIET Africa (CSTL’s funding and implementing partners, respectively) to two CSTL laboratory schools.

This report by our CEO, Lynn van der Elst

Chingoli is a large primary school (Grades 1–8), with an enrolment of over 2000 learners, who are drawn from a severely impoverished area outside Blantyre. The school was physically destroyed by the floods in 2015, and since then has been operating out of a church hall and tents provided by UNICEF, while it awaits the building of new premises.

During the visit, the principal, teachers, parents and learners all testified about the transformation the school experienced regarding how learners are treated since the introduction of CSTL. Furthermore, we saw the value that CSTL capacity-building has had for the teachers and learners:

  • Teachers shared with us how they have integrated care and support into the Life Skills curriculum,
B-BBEE for Education NGOs: Invitation to Regional Workshops

B-BBEE for Education NGOs: Invitation to Regional Workshops

B-BBEE for Education NGOs: Regional Workshops to be held in Gauteng, Western Cape and KwaZulu-Natal

Following on from the Education NGO Leadership Summit, that was hosted by National Education Collaboration Trust (NECT) in March 2016, a call for nominations was made for people to serve on an interim Education NGO Steering Committee. The Steering Committee met in December 2016 and has identified B-BBEE as a priority area for Education NGOs. Research has been commissioned, with support from the NECT, and three regional workshops are planned for March 2017:

● Johannesburg, 6 March 2017 09:00 – 12:00

● Cape Town, 7 March 2017 09:00 – 12:00

● Durban, 8 March 2017 09:00 – 12:00

Download invitation below:

 Download invitation